This week the UK national newspaper - The Sunday Times - published an article about one of the many stunning beaches we have nearby - Praia da Amoreira - calling it `the best beach in Europe´ (whilst this is common knowledge to locals and visitors, it is great that this awesome beach is getting the wider recognition it fully deserves).

One minor point - the article says if cricket was played in Portugal it would be played on this beach --- well we took our cricket bats down to Amoreira with some guests and recreated an Ashes match last summer :-)

Amoreira, along with Arrifana and Monte Clerigo (all local beaches to us) was also mentioned in The Guardian, in 2015, as 1 of the top 10 places to visit for a family holiday in Europe.

We have a great local band `Off The Lip´ and my favourite song of theirs, called Amoreira, is all about how wonderful it is to be on this beach! If the band would only release it as a single, i could share a link to it (hint hint)

Article below copied from The Sunday Times (January 8th 2017):


What makes the perfect beach? We think we’ve found it

 

A* Algarve: Atlantic breakers hit the broad sands of Praia da Amoreira
ALAMY

It’s an argument we’ve had time and again on the Travel desk: what makes the perfect beach?

There’s no such thing as perfection, of course — some killjoy will always pick holes — but, despite the lost tempers, we’ve reached a loose consensus. And, last summer, we may have stumbled across an arc of sand that ticks almost all of our (highly subjective) fantasy-beach boxes. The best beach in Europe? We’re sticking our necks out and saying yes.

It’s called Praia da Amoreira, and it’s in Portugal, on a stretch of wild coast that proves that the Algarve isn’t just timeshares, golf courses and expats.

 

Looking upstream at the River Aljezur
SABINE LUBENOW/GETTY

Why did we love it so? First, it’s in Portugal, which, whatever the euro’s doing, is cheap. It’s a land of €1 bottles of Sagres lager and 50¢ espressos. At the single catering option on Amoreira — the Paraiso do Mar restaurant, at the beach’s northern end — a whole grilled sea bream with spuds, at current exchange rates, costs less than £13. Much better than bringing your own sandwiches.

Second, it’s a bit remote: you’ll find it down a winding road off the N120, five miles from the town of Aljezur. But it’s not that remote: it’s only 1½ hours from the airport, and you can park right by Paraiso do Mar on a quiet day.

Third, it’s an amalgam of pleasing geology: dark, moody cliffs, dunes and soft sands that blend into sticky as you approach the shoreline. The tidal range is epic, revealing rock pools to play in at low tide. If we’re honest, we like it because it’s rather like one of our own: this could be Cornwall or Wales if it wasn’t 25C. And if they played cricket in Portugal, they’d be doing it here, at low tide, on the sodden but perfectly firm sand.

If we were being picky, we’d warn you that Amoreira, like one of our own beaches, can be a bit... blowy. This is the Atlantic, after all, not the pond-like waters of the Aegean. So the sea isn’t always ideal for swimming — the lifeguards (another tick for their presence) will put out signs to that effect. But where there’s wind, there’s surfing, and at Amoreira the waves are beginner-friendly. There’s a surf school on the sand, too, Surflife Atlantic Riders, housed in a little shack on stilts, and staffed by hot and hunky salty twentysomethings of all nations.

The best bit, though, is the river — a must-have for any beach with serious claims on perfection. The Aljezur drains here, a shallow, sheltered, warm, slow-flowing snake with its own dune-backed beach to the east, cliffs rising to the west and mini islands popping up at low tide. It’s for kids, for stand-up paddleboarders, for everyone.

And National Trust, take note: the car park is free. We rest our case.

The nearest airport to Praia da Amoreira is Faro